Privacy Policy

1.         This blog is hosted at WordPress.com.

WordPress and it service providers (the “Hosts”) host this blog.  They might collect certain information from you when you access and use this blog.  I am not responsible for the practices or policies of the Hosts.  You should visit the WordPress.com site for information about that.

2.         This blog uses cookies.

A “cookie” is an element of data that a website like bigdataandthelaw.com can send to your browser, which may then be stored on your computer system.  It can help provide you with a tailored user experience, to understand your preferences and to personalize the content you see.  Some bigdataandthelaw.com pages use cookies.  I do not require that you accept cookies.  You can set your browser to notify you when you receive cookies, and to block them.

3.         Referrers.

A “referrer” is the information passed along by a web browser that references the web URL from which you come to bigdataandthelaw.com. Referrers are automatically collected by the Hosts’ web servers and made available to me.  I use referrers to identify the websites referring traffic to bigdataandthelaw.com.  I may also use referrers to present appropriate content to bigdataandthelaw.com users, and to identify general trends and traffic patterns.  For example, I may use referrer information to identify the information on bigdataandthelaw.com that is viewed by individuals referred by certain websites.

4.         IP addresses.

IP addresses are used by your computer every time you are connected to the Internet. Your IP address is a number that is used to identify your computer so that data (such as the web pages you request) can be sent to you. They are automatically collected by the Hosts’ web servers.

5.         System information.

System information I collect might include, among other things, the type of web browser being used. This information is sent automatically by your web browser when you are connected to a website and I use it to identify broad demographic statistics and general trends and traffic patterns.

6.         Information you provide.

From time to time you might choose to provide information to me.  For example, this occurs when you register to make comments.

7.         Information use.

The information I collect may be used in an aggregated and de-identified form to understand general user trends and other similar information.

8.         Information disclosure.

At times, I must disclose information about my customers to business partners.  For example, I might have to respond to requests for information from law enforcement agencies or as required in civil litigation.  I might also need to disclose certain information to businesses that provide services to me, so that they may perform those services.  I require such service providers to keep your information confidential.

I might also disclose to others the information regarding your access to and use of bigdataandthelaw.com, provided that, to the best of my knowledge, it is de-identified.  This information might include referrer information and the other information that I collect through bigdataandthelaw.com.

9.         Future technologies and methods.

As technologies change, I might collect information in different ways.  However, I will continue to treat all personal information that I collect with the same confidentiality, unless I modify this Privacy Policy.

 10.       Privacy policy changes.

My use of the information you provide to me, or that I collect about you, is subject to the Privacy Policy in effect at the time the information is provided or collected.  However, I may change this Privacy Policy.  You should check bigdataandthelaw.com frequently for changes to this Privacy Policy.

11.       Opting out of communication.

I might communicate with you through means other than this blog.  You may opt out of receiving those communications from me.  The process for opting out will be described in the communications you receive.  If you have any difficulty in opting out, you may contact me as described in this Privacy Policy.

12.       Governing Law.  This Privacy Policy will be interpreted and construed in accordance with the laws of the State of Minnesota.   All disputes, controversies and claims that arise of or relate to this Privacy Policy will be settled by arbitration in Minneapolis, Minnesota by the American Arbitration Association under its Commercial Arbitration.  The arbitration will be administered by a single arbitrator.  All proceedings will be conducted in the English language.  Judgment on the award rendered by the arbitrator may be entered in any court having jurisdiction thereof.

13.       Contact.

Please contact me directly at privacy@bigdataandthelaw.com with any Privacy Policy questions or comments you may have.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s